Epson Technology Used By Royal Academy Schools Students

2013-07-30 16:24:54

Published on 2013-07-30 16:24:54

The modern expansion of printing

Printing has evolved significantly in recent years, with a range of different models and capabilities being brought to the market for consumers to use.

Thanks to developments in the sector, more people are now taking advantage of specialised machines that cater for certain types of businesses, boosting efficiency and allowing organisations to be more productive.

Rather than settling for unsatisfactory and time-consuming programs, companies can now look for hardware that is tailored to their individual needs.

For example, there are now high numbers of models in the market that are focussed on photo printing, offering businesses the chance to deliver high-quality images that could play a key role in their success.

Customers are bound to be more impressed by clean and clear photographs as opposed to grainy images that many individuals are left with when they use standard models.

The main concern for organisations is managing the amount of ink they use. To tackle this, bosses should ensure that they track all of the cartridges they use, which will enable them to use ink more prudently.

For instance, if a business is running low on colour, they could instead focus on using black ink for the rest of their documents and resources, which will save them money in the long run and give them the chance to preserve colour for only the most important articles.

Furthermore, it may be advisable to track workers’ usage of ink. Those who use the cartridges excessively could be capped, meaning they will need to pay for them after a particular point.  

Epson’s work with Royal Academy Schools

Education is one area where printing technologies can make a massive difference, and the Royal Academy Schools recently hosted its annual exhibition of final year postgraduate work, where the work of 17 artists was profiled.

Many of the pieces were developed using Epson machines and projectors, which were available to students via the Digital Media Suite, where individuals were able to experiment with a range of materials and designs.

The Royal Academy Schools provides Britain’s only three-year full time postgraduate course and it is regarded as a Centre of Excellence in the art world, with the exhibition giving people the chance to view unfinished art across a range of media, including photography and film.

Nick White, business manager, ProGraphics at Epson UK said: “As a leading supplier of technology to the fine art market, Epson is very keen to support young artists. 

“Through our partnership with the Royal Academy Schools, we are able to offer the students the opportunity to test Epson’s equipment to its limit and experiment with their creative ideas.”

The show has been established as one of the most exciting and creative of all the UK’s graduation exhibitions, with art collectors, dealers and museum curators all taking advantage of record-breaking sales of works and gallery deals.

It is believed that around 10,000 visitors attended the shows, indicating the level of exposure offered by the exhibition.

The artworks

A wide number of young artists appeared at the event to showcase their latest work, including Adham Faramawy, who exhibited a selection of works that used video installation, inkjet print and pixellated paint technologies.

Furthermore, James Robertson introduced a selection of digital media as part of his showcase, including digitally-produced laser cut-outs that were printed onto foamex and depicted a young feminist campaigner.

Nick White, business manager, ProGraphics at Epson UK, said: “As a leading supplier of technology to the fine art market, Epson is very keen to support young artists. 

“Through our partnership with the Royal Academy Schools, we are able to offer the students the opportunity to test Epson’s equipment to its limit and experiment with their creative ideas.”

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